Monthly Archives: Apr 2012

Put an Olé on your Cinco de Mayo party and day!

Cinco de Mayo this year is on Saturday and it kept me thinking, I have no working excuse and we need to make it bigger than any other years!

We usually have a Mexican Dinner with tacos to be made by each one of us, using a variety of 20+ ingredients. This year, I am planning a whole day of fun, so we will be having Huevos Rancheros

Breakfast Burrito                                                                        

This breakfast burrito stuffed with eggs, cheese and sausage will melt in your mouth and is perfectly portable for on the go lifestyles.

Ingredients:

  • 3 oz chorizo sausage, finely chopped
  • 2 eggs, whisked
  • 2 tablespoons sour cream
  • 2 oz. of your favorite Mexican cheese, shredded or crumbled
  • 1 large burrito-sized tortilla

Preparation:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.In a small pan, cook the chorizo over medium heat until cooked through. Drain excess fat.Place the tortilla on a cookie sheet covered with a very damp, clean dish towel. Let the tortilla cook for about 3 minutes.Whisk together the eggs and sour cream.  It’s okay if it’s slightly lumpy.  Pour the eggs into the pan over the chorizo and cook over medium heat and stir while cooking to scramble the eggs.

Take the tortilla out of the oven and place eggs down the center and then top with shredded cheese.  Fold up the burrito and let it sit for about one minute to let the burrito mold itself closed

Huevos Chorizo Scramble                                                                   

This delicious concoction of Mexican flavors is sure to wake up your taste buds!

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Total Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1/2 cup cooked, crumbled, chorizo
  • 2 tablespoons canned, diced green chiles
  • 1/4 cup shredded jack cheese
  • 1 teaspoon cilantro leaves, finely chopped
  • 1 green onion diced
  • 1/2 teaspoon oil or lard
  • 2 avocado slices (optional)
  • a dollop of sour cream (optional)

Preparation:

Warm oil or lard over medium heat in a small pan. Pour egg into pan, constantly stirring to scramble.  When eggs are almost done, fold in chorizo, chiles, cilantro and onion.  Remove from heat.  Sprinkle cheese over the top. Let it sit in the warm pan for 2 minutes to melt cheese and warm ingredients.  Garnish with avocado slices and sour cream.

 

for breakfast! I know you are going to say too many eggs! We love eggs at my house, so it will be a desayuno con huevos! Would love to see your pics! Please send me if you try! [email protected]

Then, we will be working on crafts:

Level of Difficulty:  Easy

Here’s what you’ll need…

• 2 Paper plates • Glue or stapler • Dried beans,  unpopped popcorn or rocks • Paint and brush

How to make it:1.

Paint your paper plates any color and design you choose – eating side down.

2.  Once the paint is dry fill one paper plate with dried beans,  rocks or anything you have around the house that will make noise.  Glue the paper plates together, and you’re done! And let’s shake it! We usually make three and form our own band! My husband plays the guitar and we sing La Bamba, using a sombrero hat! My son loves dancing, so we dance using this and other Spanish songs! So much fun, after all, it’s fiesta!

Lunch Time, we usually eat something light, like an ensalada de fruta, fruit salad with table cream, only found in Hispanic and Portuguese stores.

Dinner time is always special, my son loves tacos, I buy low fat tortillas and warm them up on a skillet and wrap them in a paper towel to keep them warm. I also chop onions, tomato, three color peppers, hot peppers, hard boiled eggs, avocado, olives and cranberries and places them in small individual containers, I also place three or four types of cheese like American, fetta, gouda shredded and cream cheese and sour cream off course! Cooked ground beef with cumin, onions salt and pepper on olive oil, small sauteed pieces of chorizo (sweet, I don’t like spicy).

Flan for dessert!                                                               

 

Ingredients

  •                     1 cup white sugar
  •                     3 eggs
  •                     1 (14 ounce) can sweetened condensed milk
  •                     1 (12 fluid ounce) can evaporated milk
  •                     1 tablespoon vanilla extract

            Directions

  1.                     Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
  2.                     In a medium saucepan over medium-low heat, melt sugar until liquefied and golden in color.  Carefully pour hot syrup into a 9 inch round glass baking dish, turning the dish to evenly coat the bottom and sides.  Set aside.
  3.                     In a large bowl, beat eggs.  Beat in condensed milk, evaporated milk and vanilla until smooth.  Pour egg mixture into baking dish.  Cover with aluminum foil.
  4.                     Bake in preheated oven 60 minutes.  Let cool completely.
  5.                     To serve, carefully invert on serving plate with edges when completely cool.

Happy Fiesta!!

Pasteles

We have just added a yummy recipe for Pasteles! This recipe is usually prepared during Christmas time by large families during Christmas time and I recommend you break it down in two days. Enjoy!

Makes about 12 to 15 pasteles, enough for 6 to 8 people

Ingredients

Masa (dough)

  • Green bananas, peeled and chopped — 5
  • Green plantain, peeled and chopped — 1
  • Yautía (taro root), peeled and chopped — 1 1/2 pounds
  • Russet potato, peeled and chopped — 1
  • Salt — to taste

Filling

  • Onion, chopped — 1
  • Green pepper, seeded and chopped — 1
  • Garlic, peeled and chopped — 3 to 4 cloves
  • Oil — 2 to 3 tablespoons
  • Pork butt or shoulder, cut into small cubes — 2 pounds
  • Tomato sauce — 1 cup
  • Water — 1/2 cup
  • Cilantro, chopped — 1/2 bunch
  • Oregano, dried — 2 teaspoons
  • Salt and pepper — to taste

For Assembly

  • Banana leaves, hard spine removed and cut into 12×6-inch rectangles — 15 pieces
  • Parchment paper, cut into 12×6-inch rectangles — 15 pieces
  • Kitchen string –15 (20-inch long) pieces and 30 (10-inch long) pieces
  • Achiote or vegetable oil — 1/4 cup

Method

  1. Masa: As you chop the bananas, plantain, yautía and potato, place the chunks into a large pot of cold, salted water to keep them from browning.
  2. Drain the water and puree the chopped ingredients in batches in a food processor. Add a little water or milk as needed to make a soft dough with the consistency of cooked oatmeal. You may have to let the processor run for a while, and make sure to scrape down the sides. Remove the masa to a large bowl and season with salt. Chill in the refrigerator while you make the filling.
  3. Filling: Add the onion, pepper and garlic to a food process and pulse to chop finely.
  4. Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium flame. Add the onion-pepper mixture and sauté for 3 to 4 minutes. Add the rest of the filling ingredients and simmer over medium-low heat for 20 minutes. Remove from heat, adjust seasoning and allow to cool.
  5. Assembly: Get the masa, the pork filling and all of your assembly ingredients together in a workspace. Lay out a piece of parchment paper, then center a piece of banana leaf over it. Wipe the banana leaf dry and then brush the top side with achiote or vegetable oil.
  6. Scoop up 1/2 cup of the masa and place in the middle of the banana leaf. Spread evenly over the leaf, leaving a 1-inch border around the edges. Place 2 to 3 tablespoons of pork filling in the middle of the masa.
  7. Fold the top edge down over the filling. Bring the bottom edge up over this. Then fold in both sides to make a rectangular packages. Be careful not to wrap it too tightly or the filling will squeeze out. Flip the package over on the parchment so it is seam side down.
  8. Fold the bottom of the parchment up over the wrapped package. Fold in each side, then roll up, burrito-like, to complete the package. Tie one of the 20-inch pieces of string around the pastel lengthwise and then three 10-inch pieces across the short side.
  9. Bring a large pot of well salted water to boil on the stove. Drop in the prepared pasteles and boil gently for 1 to 1 1/2 hours.
  10. Remove from the water with tongs, remove the outer parchment and serve the pasteles with or without their banana leaf wrapping. Goes well with arroz con gandules.

Variations

  • The recipe above is a basic pasteles filling. Additional items are often added to the filling when the pasteles are wrapped. Add 5 or 6 capers and 1 pimento-stuffed olive to the filling of each pastel. Or add 5-6 cooked garbanzos.
  • Pasteles can also be made with chicken, shrimp or ground beef. For vegetarian pasteles, substitute 2 (15-ounce) cans of drained garbanzos for the pork.
  • Stir a little of the sauce from the filling into the masa to give it extra flavor.
  • Puree 1/2 pound of peeled, chopped calabaza squash with the masa if you like. Or substitute yuca (cassava root) for the yautía.
  • If you want to avoid all the string tying, use aluminum foil to wrap up the pasteles instead of parchment paper.
  • Wrapped, uncooked pasteles freeze well for later use. Cook them directly from the frozen state.

Notes

  • Pasteles are a favorite Puerto Rican dish. They are special occasion food, and no Boricuan Christmas table is complete without them.
  • Don’t worry if your first few pasteles look kind of funny. The work will get easier and you will get better at it as you make more of them.
  • Spread the work over more than one day by making the masa and filling up ahead. Chilled masa is much easier to work with. Then gather some family or friends and make the pasteles in an assembly line. The work is much faster this way, and it makes for good family fun.
  • The special ingredients for pasteles–taro root, plantains, banana leaves–can be purchased at most Asian or Latino markets.
Open Minded and Supportive Mate Taken!

This past Friday My hubby and I celebrated our 10th year anniversary and it made me think about my choice of moving here, how much it changed my life and that I would not change a bit! When we were talking about getting married and even before, when we were dating, I kept giving him some clues and watching how he would react and if he had any preconceived ideas regarding Latinos or foreigners and he didn’t!
I wanted to share some ups and downs and how, as a latina woman, I am sure I have found the open minded and supportive mate I needed!
Language Barrier

As an English Speaker since I was 5 and having English as my major in college, being a fluent speaker since I was 12; I found this was my first obstacle, my first challenge on my newly found “mate”, who claimed to be an English expert and would insist on correcting me and my pronunciation! I felt like bringing up Ferdinand de Saussure and tell him about languages and how they are not better than others and all that good talk, but I easily found out that it would be useless, so I embraced my teacher and learned from and with him. He has proven to be a wonderful and harsh teacher, but just what I needed! LOL, after all, it’s all about compromising!!

From starving to gourmet cook

When I moved, as every good Brazilian woman, I had never seen a broom or a kitchen stove in my life, I have had maids since I was born and housework and cooking were not on my menu! Guess, what? When I moved, a hard reality hit me! I now had to clean, but at first, I said, since I am cleaning, I don’t need to cook! BIG BIG mistake! My husband taste involved no coffee at all and when cooking, taking the chicken out of the freezer with no condiment whatsoever and place it in the oven, as white as snow, as I used to say! Needless to say I lost 10 pounds, starved due to total lack of interest on what was on my plate, reaching a size 0 when I got married! I, then, decided to learn how to cook! Called my mom, who is an excellent cook and borrowed some family recipes and started trying…first burned and soggy rices did not stop me! Today, I cook Chinese, Hispanic, Brazilian, Italian and American dished and last Easter, I surprised my sister with a dish she never “dared” to make, and it turned out super yummy, the Vatapa! Again, needless to say, I’m not a size 0 anymore! LOL and he learned to develop a taste for my comida deliciosa and for coffee off course!

Culture

He also proven to be very supportive of my culture and proud of my heritage, bragging to everybody about the 4 languages I speak and about my businesses and how much he enjoys traveling to Brazil! Honestly, I know some things there bother him, like the heat and the food sometimes, but I have never, in 10 years, heard him say anything bad about it or complain.

Love

When we were talking about the wedding and all, I kept thinking about the old stereotype, you see, me, thinking about stereotypes?? How American man were known in Brazil, for being cold and not affectionate! Well, I embraced my fears and my husband proved to be very loving, caring and does everything, way and beyond to please me…..trust me, this is not an easy task, but he manages to accomplish it with honors! I would not trade my American for any other, Latin or not!! He gave up on a lot of things he had dear to his hear to also compromise and show me love and I understand and deeply appreciate it and have done the same in several occasions!

Suerte?

You might be thinking I am plain lucky, suerte??? No!
Life is a commitment, it’s give and take, it’s about always seeing the best in every situation and knowing you have a lot of imperfections and that loving your “mate’s” imperfections is a part of the covenant you made with your life, the covenant of pursuing Happiness!

Anyway, in a nutshell, this is a very brief summary of how I have found the best Mate Who Is “Latino, Educated, Open-Minded and Supportive:”

Cheers!

Rica Sonrisa

Bienvenido a mi Rica Sonrisa!
Where our dishes are guaranteed to put a smile on your face!!

The Place in our Blog where I will be posting my adventures in the Hispanic Cusine always promising to deliver dishes which take 30min or less! All the time I usually have to prepare our meals. If you are Hispanic, you probably know 101% of Hispanic Dishes take a long time, the longer it takes, mas rico el sabor!
I have decided to use my own experiences and adapted recipes which do not skip the flavor part, just some prep work using some Goya’s products and other special tips!

This week I will be sharing two recipes, Huevos Rancheros and A Cinco de Mayo Feast!

Try this Huevos Rancheros recipe, which a friend of mine shared and it is so yummy!

Huevos Rancheros

Makes 4 servings

3 tbsp. olive oil, divided
1/2 yellow onion, chopped
1/2 red bell pepper, chopped
1/2 green bell pepper, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 tsp. kosher salt
1/4 tsp. cumin
1/4 tsp. ground black pepper
1/4 tsp. dried oregano
1/8 tsp. cayenne pepper
1 1/2 cups tomatoes and their juices, chopped (or diced canned tomatoes)
1/2 cup chicken stock
1 tbsp. jalapeño peppers, finely chopped (or ortega chiles, for milder heat)
2 tbsp. fresh cilantro, finely chopped
8 corn tortillas
8 large eggs

Directions

To make the Ranchera Sauce, heat 1 tbsp. oil in medium pot over medium-high heat. Add onion, bell peppers and garlic. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 6-8 minutes, or until onion begins to soften. Add salt, cumin, pepper, oregano and cayenne pepper and stir to combine. Add tomatoes, chicken stock and jalapeños and bring to a simmer. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes. Remove cover, add cilantro and cook an additional 5-8 minutes, or until sauce begins to thicken. Season with salt and/or pepper, to taste.

In a small skillet, add 1/2 tsp. oil over medium-high heat. Add 1 tortilla at a time and cook on each side until golden brown, about 30-45 seconds per side. Keep warm by wrapping in paper towel while you cook the eggs.

Heat remaining 1/2 tbsp. oil in large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the eggs to the pan and lightly season with kosher salt and pepper. Fry eggs until the egg whites no longer giggle on top and turn white. Cover pan with lid and cook additional 1 1/2 to 2 minutes, or until eggs are cooked sufficiently (If you would rather your eggs over medium, just flip the eggs over on their yolks and remove from heat after 1 minute).

To plate, place 2 tortillas next to each other on the plate and top each tortilla with a fried egg. Spread desired amount of Ranchera Sauce over the eggs.

Enjoy!

 

This week, we are bringing you Pasteles, I personally never tried this recipe by myself, I helped a friend once, but I must warn you, it is very time consuming, but worth it! Try and share!

 

Makes about 12 to 15 pasteles, enough for 6 to 8 people

Ingredients

Masa (dough)

  • Green bananas, peeled and chopped — 5
  • Green plantain, peeled and chopped — 1
  • Yautía (taro root), peeled and chopped — 1 1/2 pounds
  • Russet potato, peeled and chopped — 1
  • Salt — to taste

Filling

  • Onion, chopped — 1
  • Green pepper, seeded and chopped — 1
  • Garlic, peeled and chopped — 3 to 4 cloves
  • Oil — 2 to 3 tablespoons
  • Pork butt or shoulder, cut into small cubes — 2 pounds
  • Tomato sauce — 1 cup
  • Water — 1/2 cup
  • Cilantro, chopped — 1/2 bunch
  • Oregano, dried — 2 teaspoons
  • Salt and pepper — to taste

For Assembly

  • Banana leaves, hard spine removed and cut into 12×6-inch rectangles — 15 pieces
  • Parchment paper, cut into 12×6-inch rectangles — 15 pieces
  • Kitchen string –15 (20-inch long) pieces and 30 (10-inch long) pieces
  • Achiote or vegetable oil — 1/4 cup

Method

  1. Masa: As you chop the bananas, plantain, yautía and potato, place the chunks into a large pot of cold, salted water to keep them from browning.
  2. Drain the water and puree the chopped ingredients in batches in a food processor. Add a little water or milk as needed to make a soft dough with the consistency of cooked oatmeal. You may have to let the processor run for a while, and make sure to scrape down the sides. Remove the masa to a large bowl and season with salt. Chill in the refrigerator while you make the filling.
  3. Filling: Add the onion, pepper and garlic to a food process and pulse to chop finely.
  4. Heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium flame. Add the onion-pepper mixture and sauté for 3 to 4 minutes. Add the rest of the filling ingredients and simmer over medium-low heat for 20 minutes. Remove from heat, adjust seasoning and allow to cool.
  5. Assembly: Get the masa, the pork filling and all of your assembly ingredients together in a workspace. Lay out a piece of parchment paper, then center a piece of banana leaf over it. Wipe the banana leaf dry and then brush the top side with achiote or vegetable oil.
  6. Scoop up 1/2 cup of the masa and place in the middle of the banana leaf. Spread evenly over the leaf, leaving a 1-inch border around the edges. Place 2 to 3 tablespoons of pork filling in the middle of the masa.
  7. Fold the top edge down over the filling. Bring the bottom edge up over this. Then fold in both sides to make a rectangular packages. Be careful not to wrap it too tightly or the filling will squeeze out. Flip the package over on the parchment so it is seam side down.
  8. Fold the bottom of the parchment up over the wrapped package. Fold in each side, then roll up, burrito-like, to complete the package. Tie one of the 20-inch pieces of string around the pastel lengthwise and then three 10-inch pieces across the short side.
  9. Bring a large pot of well salted water to boil on the stove. Drop in the prepared pasteles and boil gently for 1 to 1 1/2 hours.
  10. Remove from the water with tongs, remove the outer parchment and serve the pasteles with or without their banana leaf wrapping. Goes well with arroz con gandules.

Variations

  • The recipe above is a basic pasteles filling. Additional items are often added to the filling when the pasteles are wrapped. Add 5 or 6 capers and 1 pimento-stuffed olive to the filling of each pastel. Or add 5-6 cooked garbanzos.
  • Pasteles can also be made with chicken, shrimp or ground beef. For vegetarian pasteles, substitute 2 (15-ounce) cans of drained garbanzos for the pork.
  • Stir a little of the sauce from the filling into the masa to give it extra flavor.
  • Puree 1/2 pound of peeled, chopped calabaza squash with the masa if you like. Or substitute yuca (cassava root) for the yautía.
  • If you want to avoid all the string tying, use aluminum foil to wrap up the pasteles instead of parchment paper.
  • Wrapped, uncooked pasteles freeze well for later use. Cook them directly from the frozen state.

Notes

  • Pasteles are a favorite Puerto Rican dish. They are special occasion food, and no Boricuan Christmas table is complete without them.
  • Don’t worry if your first few pasteles look kind of funny. The work will get easier and you will get better at it as you make more of them.
  • Spread the work over more than one day by making the masa and filling up ahead. Chilled masa is much easier to work with. Then gather some family or friends and make the pasteles in an assembly line. The work is much faster this way, and it makes for good family fun.
  • The special ingredients for pasteles–taro root, plantains, banana leaves–can be purchased at most Asian or Latino markets.

Recipe taken from LatinFood.com

 

 

Well, my opening recipe is Frijoles con Carne, an originally Cuban recipe, sprinkled with a PuertoRican Sabor!

First I season 1 pound of ground beef with cumin, salt, pepper and a little bit of red pepper, leave it in the fridge all day. At night, when it’s prep time, I chop one onion ( small), 2 cloves of garlic and sauté them and add meat when the onion leaves some of its juice! Que Rico!!! While the meat is cooking, I place 2 cups of water and one tablespoon of EVOO (extra virgin olive oil- I buy imported from Spain, for the best taste; I buy it at Wegmans) until it boils and I cook a package of Goya Rice and Beans, I chose the non hot packages like Arroz con frijoles Negros, because my son and hubby don’t like spicy hot dishes. I use 2 cups because I don’t like the rice looking like a risotto, I like it dry and crisp, South American way. If you like it soft, soft, cook it with 2 1/2 cups of water. The water will determine the texture of the rice, which is very important in this dish! When the rice is lose and you see no more water on the pot, it’s done! Please stir occasionally, specially if you have electric stove. I drained the ground beef before pouring in the middle of the bed of rice and beans. It took me 20 min to cook this dish! Low in calories and rico en sabor! Enjoy! Buen Provecho!

Claudia


Games in Latin Countries

¡Saludos!

Looking for some games to play during my son’s spring break, I have found great games you can use in our classroom or with your children! I was looking about games which bring movement, exercise and outdoor activities, since my son’s indoor video gaming habits are a concern to me!

From Mexico:

MEXICO NORTH AMERICA

Colorinas

Ages: 9-12 Supplies: small beans

Players: 4-6; individual; informal Activity: pasttime; catching; tossing

Place: gymnasium; out-of-doors Appeal: skill

A small hole is dug in the ground if played out-of-doors, or a bowl placed on the floor if played indoors.

A line is drawn about 8 feet away from the hole. The players take a handful of little red beans called

colorinas and stand on the line. One at a time the players see how many beans they can throw into the hole.

The whole handful of beans must be released at one time. If any fall into the hole, the player picks them up

and puts them in the palm of one hand. Then with a jerk he or she throws the beans into the air and tries to

catch them on the back of the hand; once again he or she throws them and catches them in the palm. The

player who has the greatest number of beans in the palm after the last person throws is the winner. The

players must each have an equal number of beans to start the game.

Little Parrot

Ages: 9-12 Supplies: small object

Players: 10-20; single-group; circle Activity: pasttime; alertness

Place: home; schoolroom Appeal: dramatization

A leader is chosen and given a small object or little parrot to hold in his or her hands; the leader and the

other players sit in a circle. The leader starts the play by turning to the player on the left and asking quite

seriously, “Would you like to buy this pretty little parrot?” The player asks just as seriously, “Will it bite?”

The leader answers, “Why, no, it will not bite,” and then passes the small object or little parrot to the player

on his left. This player turns to the player on his or her left (or the third player) and asks, “Would you like

to buy this parrot?” The third player asks, “Will it bite?” When the second player is asked the question

about the parrot biting, he or she must not reply. He or she must turn to the leader and ask, “Will it bite?”

The leader answers, “Why, no, it will not bite,” whereupon the second player turns to the third player and

repeats, “Why, no, it will not bite,” and passes the little parrot to him or her.

The play continues with questioning always going back from player to player until it reaches the leader.

The answer, “Why, no, it will not bite,” is repeated to the player holding the little parrot. Should a player

laugh or forget to pass the little parrot, he or she must pay a penalty.

BRAZIL SOUTH AMERICA

Mela Mela Tin (Mehlah- Mehlah- Teen)

Ages 3-5

Children with children or parent with child will have noses touching and rub against them, saying mela, mela, mela tin! When the tin comes, you lightly hit your head on your child’s or let children do it, they will have so much fun!

 

Amarelinha

Ages 5-12

Like hop scotch, but a bean bag is used

 

Picula

Ages 6-14

Children run to tag the others and place them in the “safe house” until there is nobody left.

 

Baleado

Ages 7-14

Kids will be on two sides, separated by a middle line, one team has a ball and try to hit the other one. The person hit is out of the game until there is only one left.

 

 

Luta de Galo

(LU-ta de GA-lo)

Ages: 9-12 Supplies: handkerchiefs

Players: any number; couple; informal Activity: contest; pushing; reaching

Place: gymnasium; out-of-doors Appeal: competition; skill

Players pair up, then they tuck handkerchiefs in their belts, place their right arm across their chest and

hop around on their right foot. The free left arm is used to reach for the opponent’s handkerchief. A player

whose left foot touches the ground or whose right arm unbends is disqualified. The player who succeeds

in getting the opponent’s handkerchief is the winner. Luta de Galo means a “fight of roosters.”

 

CHILE SOUTH AMERICA

Who Is It?

Ages: teen Supplies: none

Players: 20 or more; group-and-one; line Activity: pasttime; guessing

Place: home; schoolroom Appeal: dramatization

One player is chosen to be leader and to head a line formed by the other players standing directly behind

the leader. The game starts as the leader asks the question, “Have you seen my friend?” The players answer,

“No, sir.” The leader then asks, “Do you know where my friend is?” The answer is, “Yes, sir.”

After this conversation the leader slowly walks forward nine steps. During this time, the players quietly

and quickly shift places in the line as they wish. One player moves directly behind the leader. The others

call, “Who is it?” The leader may ask three questions of the players before he or she answers. The questions

may be, “Is it boy or girl? Is he fair or dark? Is he short or tall?” After asking the three questions the leader

must guess who stands behind him or her. Should the leader guess correctly, he or she is leader again;

otherwise another player becomes the leader.

 

COLOMBIA SOUTH AMERICA

La Cachanga

(La Ca-CHAN-ga)

Ages: 9-12 Supplies: shoe

Players: 15-30; group-and-one; circle Activity: hunting; kneeling; passing

Place: gymnasium; out-of-doors Appeal: rhythm; skill

The term la cachanga is Spanish for a sandal made of cotton. The sole of the shoe is flat and the shoe

is held on by a strap. The players are in a close circle, kneeling on one knee, the other is at right angles. A

shoe is passed quickly under the knee of each player. One player on the outside of the circle moves around

the group in the direction in which the shoe is sent and tries to locate the shoe. The circle players say

together repeatedly,

Que corra la cachanga The sandal that runs

Que corra la cachanga. The sandal that runs.

If the outside player locates the shoe, he or she taps the shoulder of the player holding it and then exchanges

places with that player.

 

PARAGUAY SOUTH AMERICA

Define, Define, What Is It?

Ages: teen Supplies: none

Players: 10 or more; group-and-one; informal Activity: pasttime; alertness; guessing

Place: home; schoolroom Appeal: dramatization

One player starts the game by presenting the group with a situation or a problem. For example, he says:

“What has six legs, four arms, and a woman’s head on it and it moves like this…..?” Then he or she moves

forward and backward. “It also has many colors, etc.” Players may make guesses as the description goes

on. The person who guesses correctly starts the next game. (Answer: a chair with a lady in it.) This game

is somewhat like the game of charades in which several players present the problem, usually in pantomime.

Please let me know if you tried and if you liked it!

Bilingual Team!

My Favorite Spring Spanish Books